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Mighty Minneapolis!

We've had some good times in Minneapolis! We went to a treehouse exhibit in the University of Minneapolis Arboteum that was cool...kind of hit-or-miss, but there were three really cool ones:


a bona-fide walk-in birdsnest--is this what TMBG had in mind?


TreeMan was my personal fave. You could walk up into his head!


The Sugar Maple Ship would have been neater if you could climb around in it, but hey...

We also went to the Walker Art Museum sculpture garden, and played 10 holes of mini-golf, each hole designed by an artist or team of artists. If you are in the Twin Cities any time soon, I highly recommend the experience. Get this! One of the photos on the Walker's website featured my high-school friend Karl Frankowski!!! He's famous!


Karl Frankowski, goin' to town!

We also watched fireworks from the Stone Arch Bridge, but I couldn't find any neat pictures of that. So much for our last hit of big-city culture until Fargo ND! Scratch that, until Minot, ND! No, Sandpoint ID! Okay, who're we fooling, Portland, here we come!!!

But seriously, there's more to life than big city culture, and Sarah and I are both looking forward to getting back on the road, camping like mofos, and not spending so much $$$.

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