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A little change of pace...

We've been off the bikes for a few weeks now, staying with and visiting friends in Portland and Seattle, and letting Sarah's poor hands rest a bit. We have not been idle, however, visiting the Oregon coast twice, hiking in the Cascades and on Mount Rainier, and doing one day of biking (Portland to Kelso/Longview, WA).

Perhaps to Sarah's chagrin, staying with friends has given me access to high-speed internet, first at Gabe's and now at Marti and Charlie's. It's nice to be a little caught up, but I think it will be even nicer to be on the move again, happily oblivious.

At any rate, here's an e-mail our friend Fightin' J sent to me (I can't for the life of me imagine why):

Bear downs 36 beers, passes out at campground
Rainier, not Busch, the beverage of choice for thirsty black bear

The Associated Press
Updated: 7:26 a.m. ET Aug. 19, 2004

BAKER LAKE, Wash. - When state Fish and Wildlife agents recently found a black bear passed out on the lawn of Baker Lake Resort, there were some clues scattered nearby — dozens of empty cans of Rainier Beer.

The bear apparently got into campers’ coolers and used his claws and teeth to puncture the cans. And not just any cans.

“He drank the Rainier and wouldn’t drink the Busch beer,” said Lisa Broxson, bookkeeper at the campground and cabins resort east of Mount Baker.

Fish and Wildlife enforcement Sgt. Bill Heinck said the bear did try one can of Busch, but ignored the rest. The beast then consumed about 36 cans of Rainier.

A wildlife agent tried to chase the bear from the campground but the animal just climbed a tree to sleep it off for another four hours. Agents finally herded the bear away, but it returned the next morning.

Agents then used a large, humane trap to capture it for relocation, baiting the trap with the usual: doughnuts, honey and, in this case, two open cans of Rainier.

That did the trick.

“This is a new one on me,” Heinck said. “I’ve known them to get into cans, but nothing like this. And it definitely had a preference


Picky bears! What's the world coming to?

Here's some pictures, courtesy of Trudy Karlson and Dan Barry:

Ladies Love Cool Will

Another Mighty Karlson

...I'm kind of at a loss for this one...

Next Post: More adventures, I promise! But it's a cool rainy Sunday in Seattle, I'm listening to Scratchy Ol' Jazz Radio Show on the alarm clock as I type, and Sarah's upstairs baking apple pie...My mind is off the open road, at present.

Love to all!

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