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Whoever this guy is,

...he's on to something.
Matt Taibbi, of Rolling Stone, writes about the dynamic of hatred that is replacing news and political discussion in America. I wish I didn't agree with him, but he's right.

http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/story/12984925/the_low_post_a_look_back_on_the_birth_of_the_hate_era/print


Why the dusty, parched Hell won't Blogger let me paste in URL's to the weblink screen that pops down when I try to make a link? My readers (well, there probably aren't any, thanks to months of inactivity on my part) deserve better than to have to do their own cutting and pasting. What a crock!

At any rate, Taibbi is exactly right. To use Al Franken as an example: as much as I like the guy's politics, he has cast himself as the anti-Rush, as the other side of the coin. The problem is the nature of the coin itself. We are stuck in the age of "he said/she said", the era of "I know you are, but what am I?" It's ugly, and it's destructive, and I don't know if it has ever been different.

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