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Unlooked for Blessings!

Well, maybe a little looked-for. I flipped on the TV yesterday morning, curious to see who was playing, and what do I find but the opening minutes of Packers v. Eagles! On live TV! In Oakland!

Bliss.

Actually, save for a few moments of excitement courtesy of Ol' Number Four, the (really-really-outstanding-looking) Packers Defensive Line, and the Eagles special teams unit, it was a pretty boring game. The Packers offense didn't drive for any touchdowns (and I think the three field goals came off of turnovers). Most of the game was a push, honestly. But it was tied up to the last minute, when Green Bay punted, the Eagles receiver muffed the punt, Green Bay recovered, and then...

And then Fox announced they were taking us to the beginning of the local game. So rather than the gripping, chilling, suspense-filled final seconds of action (which I found out later culminated in Mason Crosby's 43 yard game winning kick) I got fifteen minutes of dull, dull, dull pregame coverage of Oakland v. Detroit, delivered by two schmoes I'd never seen before on a broadcast (Fox's D-Team, no doubt; I mean, Raiders/Lions? Who's gonna watch that?!!?)

I was left super-unsatisfied. Super Unsatisfied. Fortunately I was able to channel that unsatisfactory energy into getting needlessly stressed out about last night's Youth Group picnic. And, the Packers won, even if I didn't get to witness it in real-time. Could be worse!

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