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Oh, the Irony!
















The Nazi airship Hitleriffic! burns over New Jersey.

Comments

Baiocco said…
Nice! "loser" was a harsh editorial add-on though. Do you know you have the same birthday as folkateer Phil Ochs? Amazin'.
Andy said…
True--bad form to put words in another's mouth. Deep-fried corn-brats, though...

(and sadly, I still have not figured out a catchy brand-name for that [hopefully] imaginary and disgustingly enticing [enticingly disgusting?] state-fair-bound product...Maizen-braten-shticken? The "Wurst" Corn You Ever Had? Baron Corny von Bratwurst's Sticky Surprise? Goethe Treats? I'm scraping bottom here...)

And yeah, I've got some hard-hitting birthday buddies: Phil Ochs, New Orleans music legend Professor Longhair, and three of the four starting defensive linemen of the Super Bowl Champion 1996 Green Bay Packers: Santana Dotson, Sean Jones, and Reggie White (RIP).

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