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Another Hobbit-hole post

This one's actual size! Oh, to have a Tolkein rarities collection, and the $$$ wherewithal to build my own real-life Hobbit Hole in order to house my opulent library in style. This is from the back page of Fine Homebuilding, a cool magazine my Dad used to subscribe to.
Each month the back page features some outlandish house, or house-building artisan. I love seeing the far-out things people do to their living space, and as my Dad pointed out, an outlandish percentage of the featured homes are in California where the gentle weather lets you do shit that would be impossible in colder, wetter climes. This one, at least, seems to be from out East. It also looks unbelievably cozy. I can envision curling up in a big leather Stickley armchair in front of that hearth on a cold, snowy December night, smoke curling up from my pipe, Black Lab at my feet, snifter of brandy in one hand and The Two Towers in the other... A guy could give himself an infarction with how great that sounds!












The library at the far end of the big room...

















How sweet is this window and bench?!?




















The big room, and awesome circular door...


And as usual, Boingboing.net led me to this location of interest!

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