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One for my Mom--

A few days late for Mother's Day, but so it goes.

Growing up as the son of an epidemiologist, public safety concerns were a prominent part of my upbringing. In particular, the importance of wearing a bike helmet when riding a bike was well and thoroughly established. To this day I think I could total up the number of times I've ridden my bike helmetless on two hands. I definitely owe a large part of my making it through childhood without suffering a traumatic brain injury to my safety-conscious mother.

So, when boingboing featured three articles related to bike-helmetry on three consecutive days it just seemed proper to provide links, and to give my beloved mother some props. Plus she's one of my only commenters, so I've gotta keep her happy. ;)

Why wear a bike helmet? Baseball bat wielding thugs!

Why wear a bike helmet? Protection against getting your head run over by a truck!

Why wear a bike helmet? It makes jerk drivers harass you!


And as Mom remembers below, I did have at least one helmet-wrecking crash in my youth. Plus that one time I inhaled too much helium out of a baloon and passed out for what seemed like a black-and-white lifetime, but was really only a few seconds. Dad said the sound my helmeted head made as it hit the asphalt made his blood run cold (paraphrase).

Comments

Anonymous said…
Finally, dual recognition as a noted blog commenter AND a nag...(just kidding). Pretty amazing about the kid whose head was run over by a bike - and just think how happy *his* mother must have been. Do you remember when you fell off your bike and broke your helmet? Dave was poopooing (sort of like boingboing but different) the crash until you held up your broken helmet.
Hope you are all done and enjoying you life in a school-free zone - and thank you, Andy dear, for wearing your helmet. Ma.
Andy said…
Hi Mom---

Just to clarify, "Dave" is my father, aka Dr. Dave. And I'm not in the school-free-zone just yet, but I am in the home stretch.

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