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Baiocco: *Update your Blog, Loser*

What Baiocco wants, Baiocco gets.

To quote Jim Anchower, I know it's been a long time since I rapped at you, but there's been a lot going down at Casa Karlson. (Not as catchy as "Rancho Anchower," but I don't write for The Onion so there's a lot less pressure. And quality control.)

The main stress between last October and this February has been applicating for various internships. At the start of the semester I realized that I was neither crazed nor masochistic nor wealthy enough to continue pursuing two Master's degrees at once, and dropped my academic degree in order to focus on my MDiv. Big relief, which allowed me to scale back to three classes--still not sure if that was a good move or not: either it was brilliant, affording me more time to get stressed out about and procrastinate aforementioned applications, or it was foolhardy, allowing me more free time to get stressed out and process that stress by being shiftless and lazy.

There are no other possibilities.
















So: three classes, a boatload of applications, plus a bushel of Ministerial Fellowshipping hoops that I'd neglected to jump through in favor of my Art and Religion binge the previous three semesters. I got the applications done, some of them even before their due dates, but the hoops are still beckoning.

Results: decent grades in three classes (B+, A-, A), and still waiting on church internships (applied to nine, have been passed over at five, and one of the four left in action is [acc. to word on the street] intentionally looking for an intern of color. I asked if Swedish-beige/ruddy counted...) (no, I didn't, and I strongly support the intentional hiring of interns representing repressed peoples and groups) (and at the same time, man I really want to be working in a church internship next year). The big good news was getting offered a CPE internship at Alta Bates Summit hospital in Oakland and Berkeley--I was not expecting that, and am incredibly excited for what will be a (potentially) future-defining experience.

Sarah has been finishing up classes for her Master's Degree in Sustainable Agriculture, which is a huge relief. We're both ready for being done with spending so much time apart for her to do school stuff--she's been gone a lot over the past year and a half, probably 7 or 8 months if you totaled up all the weekends and week-long trips, and half-weeks for herb school and New College. It's been a lot and I'm really excited to have more time and more consistency. Ready to be in a full-time marriage again.

The current (huge) stress for Sarah is completing her thesis. She was planning on using this trimester for research, and then writing over the summer trimester to be done in time for our move away from CA in the fall. The kink in the plan? The not-unforeseen and ongoing implosion of New College. So now the pressure's on: she has to finish her 1st Draft by the 18th, and then finish the whole thing just a few weeks after that. The stakes? Pulling in her MA before the school completey falls apart.

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