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Trivial Pursuits

On Saturday, consumed with cabin fever, Sarah and I went down to The Albatross, a board-games themed bar in Berkeley. It's not The Weary Traveler, but pretty great nonetheless. We sat in front of the fireplace and played Trivial Pursuit and drank Sierra Nevada and ate complimentary popcorn. Pretty idyllic.

One of the questions Sarah got was "What was Adolf Hitler's favorite movie?" Her guess was Gone with the Wind, which I thought was pretty good--it was the first thought in my mind, too. The answer, though, was King Kong. Hitler's favorite movie was King Kong. It gave us both a shiver, a twisted little glimpse inside one of humanity's greatest preversions.

On a happier note, Earthquake!!! The whole house just flexed and shook for a second, and everyone at home said, with one voice, "Earthquake!" Pretty cool! 11:35 am PST. Just a small one, though. Nothing fell off the shelves or anything.

Comments

Anonymous said…
But Adolf Hitler doesn't even look like Brett....

I like the image of your whole house responding as one voice. Love, Mom.

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